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Sobriety Checkpoint (Some Time, Somewhere) This Week

When the place and time is announced, Patch will post an update on the site. Continue to check the site this week to find out the details.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol announced Monday morning that a sobriety checkpoint will be set up soon ... but the place and time has not been announced yet. 

The county where the checkpoint will take place will be announced the day prior to the checkpoint and the location will be announced the morning of the checkpoint.

The purpose of the checkpoint is to intercept impaired drivers, according to the OSHP. 

“Based on provisional data, there were 332 OVI related fatal crashes in which 359 people were killed last year in Ohio,” Lieutenant Nakia J. Hendrix, Commander of the Patrol’s Ravenna Post, said. “State troopers make on average 25,000 OVI arrests each year in combating these dangerous drivers. OVI checkpoints are designed to not only deter impaired driving, but to proactively remove these dangerous drivers from our roadways.”

The last checkpoint announced was on . Officers . 

"If you plan to consume alcohol, designate a driver or make other travel arrangements before you drink," the press release stated. "Don’t let another life be lost for the senseless and selfish act of getting behind the wheel impaired."

Operational support for the sobriety checkpoints will be provided by local law enforcement agencies.

Check Patch for an update on where and when the checkpoint will be set up. 

Ken McEntee April 09, 2012 at 04:45 PM
Despite a U.S. Supreme Court ruling (6-3) that suspicionless sobriety checkpoints do not violate Constitutional rights, 11 states disagree and have prohibited their use. Ohio should join that crowd. In a strange twist of reason, Supreme Court Justice Rehnquist wrote for the majority in Michigan v. Sitz that checkpoints DO violate the Fourth Amendment's seizure statutes, but are necessary and effective to combat drunk driving. I think the same logic can be used to open the door and justify any government abuse. Writing for the minority, Justice Stevens noted that statistics show that they are NOT effective in reducing drunk driving. Although the U.S. Supreme Court's decision upheld Michigan's use of sobriety checkpoints, the Michigan Supreme Court responded by acknowledging the federal decision, but ruled that the checkpoints DO violate the state's Constitution, thereby disallowing them to be used in Michigan. I don't advocate drunken driving. But instead of violating the rights of citizens by subjecting them to police interrogation without suspicion of a crime, we can start to address the problem by enforcing strict laws against drivers who are convicted of DUI instead of slapping their wrists and putting them back behind the wheel.
Bob Abooey April 09, 2012 at 08:48 PM
Totally agree with Ken. Ever since law school (20 years ago), that decision has really bothered me because it's just plain wrong. It's not a liberal/conservative issue. It's just a blatant violation of the 4th Amendment.
Jack Kelly April 09, 2012 at 09:46 PM
I might be confusing an issue here, but wasn't there some sort of legal action a few years ago regarding checkpoints which resulted in the announcement of the specific locations of where the DUI checkpoints will be conducted?
The original Bill April 09, 2012 at 10:16 PM
It DOES reduce the amount of drunk drivers on the road. If they only arrest one person at the checkpoint that's one less drunk driver that could kill somebody. It's really pretty simple: Don't drink and drive and the police at the sobriety checkpoints wont arrest you.
The original Bill April 09, 2012 at 10:18 PM
I don't know but I think they shouldn't announce where and when. How many innocent people have to die from being hit by drunk drivers?
Debbie Palmer April 09, 2012 at 10:39 PM
Jack is right -- the location and time has to be announced. The police agency usually lets people know where it is that morning, if not the day before.
Jim Husted April 10, 2012 at 11:43 AM
Having worked at several check points, I can assure you that the police are not interrogating without suspicion of a crime, anyone who is sober. They thank them and send them on their way. The only ones getting interrogating are the drunks. Are the check points effective? With Ohio laws, I would say minimal. Ohio has so many multiple offenders. Something needs to be done about that and no one is in a hurry to correct this problem. I believe that the only rights being violated are the sober ones driving while drunks continue to drive.
Steve83 April 10, 2012 at 02:49 PM
I am going to go a few steps further on this and say we need to go deal closer to the root cause than just punishing the convicted. Unless they are thrown in jail - revoking a drivers license or restricting driving priviledges does not work as they just continue to drive. More work needs to be done to treat alcoholism and drug abuse so they aren't under the influence to begin with. To go one step further, we need more innovative prevention programs in schools so kids don't become alcoholics and drug addicts to begin with. So little money is spent on EFFECTIVE prevention and treatment programs as opposed to cleaning up the mess afterwards. My opinion is you need all three - prevention in schools, treatment for the addicted, and strong punishment for those who are convicted to really deal with this problem. 10,000 people are killed by drunken driving in one year. Think about situations where a lot fewer people are killed and the public support and outcry against those situations. Put that kind of support behind this issue and maybe a significant reduction can be made.
Steve April 10, 2012 at 07:38 PM
Lakewood has one of the highest concentrations of bars in Ohio, But we think pit-bulls are more dangerous to our citizens. Time to get better educated, Lakewood.
Alexandra April 11, 2012 at 12:52 AM
We all.must watch how much we consume.and never drive if we feel.even.slightly affected
Steve83 April 11, 2012 at 04:50 AM
I am going to go a few steps further on this and say we need to deal with this closer to the root cause rather than just punishing the convicted. Unless they are thrown in jail - revoking a drivers license or restricting driving privileges does not work as they just continue to drive. More work needs to be done to treat alcoholism and drug abuse so they aren't under the influence to begin with. To go one step further, we need more innovative prevention programs in schools so kids don't become alcoholics and drug addicts to begin with. So little money is spent on EFFECTIVE prevention and treatment programs as opposed to cleaning up the mess afterwards. For every $1 spent on prevention the State of Ohio saves $7 spent on drug and alcohol addiction related costs. My opinion is you need all three - prevention in schools, treatment for the addicted, and strong punishment for those who are convicted to really deal with this problem. 10,000 people are killed by drunken driving in one year. Think about situations where a lot fewer people are killed and the public support and outcry against those situations. Put that kind of support behind this issue and maybe a significant reduction can be made.
Debbie S. April 11, 2012 at 07:22 PM
Schools can't do a darn thing to prevent this situation where parents think the behavior is fine or even funny. Kids don't become drug or alcohol addicted at school. Kids become drug and alcohol addicted because they don't have the self-respect or strength to say no to the peer pressure - or because their parents, grandparents, aunts, or uncles themselves are drug or alcohol abusers or addicted. Where parents don't monitor behavior or worse, pass off underage drinking as "something everyone does" the problem will continue.
Steve April 12, 2012 at 12:10 AM
@Debbie, I do believe it is the adults, some are parents, that are stopped for dui/dwi. And YES they do get addicted AT school. It's called peer pressure or bullying, and it is still not really being addressed. Thats a school problem too.
Steve83 April 13, 2012 at 05:25 AM
@debbie - I don't mean to throw this off on the schools as if that is the problem - but a lot of interactions between students start at the schools and it is a place where programs can be implemented because the students are already there. Also, many traditional prevention programs don't work because they don't really deal with the issues behind this. Just saying "Drugs are Bad" isn't sufficient. Something more innovative - there are various new programs out there in the surrounding areas. Leadership, alternative activities, bullying, self worth, etc. all need to be addressed. Make it attractive and cool to be drug and alcohol free instead of making it bad or taboo to use drugs or alcohol. Parents are also a key factor but harder to address as they are not a captive audience. No easy answers to this but more work needs to be done to turn this around.
Christopher Hansen April 16, 2012 at 11:30 PM
@Debbie assuming all drugs are as harmful as they are made out to be. Did you not smoke marijuana sometime in your life? Was it the horrible experience and gave you the cancer they said it would?

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